Nutrition Facts Labeling Enhancements (design)

Nutrition Facts Labeling Enhancements (design)

I have been very interested in label. One exploration was a series of small additions to the standard Nutrition Facts label that could make it function better for consumers. These include: “Serving size” is bolded. Calorie percentages are shown visually at the top of the calorie column. This adds support for those watching the mix of calories they intake (such as those on the Zone diet). Components of macro nutrition total in all columns and specific sub-components are listed but not in these columns. Macro nutrition is unified and more complete (with grams, calories, and daily amount). Key micro nutritional elements called-out first (Sodium, Dietary Fiber, Cholesterol, etc.) but not mixed with macro nutritional information to avoid confusion. These are also bolded. Micro nutrition follows macro nutrition Use of condensed fonts made possible and optional. Vitamins are listed alphabetically to begin with, followed by the rest of the ingredients. Uppercase is never used for content, only for select headings. This makes all content easier to read. Ingredients are listed in natural language and no double parentheses. The location of manufacture is integrated into this heading. Ingredients determined by research to be dangerous to consumers are called-out with a special symbol (Ý) and bolded A URL is required for more information and product support along with a phone number. Note: The example Nutrition Facts label on this page is representative of the different possible sections within a real product label and not data for any real product nor is it expected for any product to include all of these sections....
Genetic Origin Labeling System (design)

Genetic Origin Labeling System (design)

This is a labeling system for consumer products that identifies which of the five major genetic origin types most appropriate for a particular product. In the future, it is likely that products will be tailored for people by their genetic type and they will need to be labeled appropriately. These types have been found to differ in key ways in five groups, corresponding around their geographic origins. The labeling system uses these origins, mapped to the Earth, to display each of the five in relation, including markers to indicate sequence and direction. Overlayed on a map, it is clear where these locations are. With the map deleted, the basic structure of the map still exists but is abstracted. The change in scale and the use of fish-eye perspective allows all of the markings to be present while the desired genetic type is clearly highlighted and unconfusable. The remaining type information keeps a remnant of these relationships, as well as a suggestion of the world map. Lastly, the use of circles in these configurations suggest an organic origin and appear visually distinct from other manufacturing labelling systems....
Experience Design 1.1 book (design, writing, and production)

Experience Design 1.1 book (design, writing, and production)

Experience Design 1.1 (2009) By Nathan Shedroff ISBN: 9780982233900 6″x9″ 308 pages, 4-color Experience Design 1.1 is the update to the seminal book Experience Design 1, published in 2001. This update expands the text in the descriptive chapters and adds may new online and offline examples. Read about Experience Design 1… It’s available for purchase as either a PDF or printed book. Also, explore the companion design cards that accompany the book and turn its text into a design tool. Sample Spreads…       Praise for the book: An insightful road guide to the “Experience Economy.” Nathan connects the dots and helps us understand the importance of “experience design”. An invaluable resource and a must to experience. Clement Mok, Chief Creative Officer, Sapient. Only in recent years has ‘experience design’ emerged as a community of practice driven by digital and related design professionals who believe that deeply understanding people is the key to great design in any medium. Appropriately, as the first book dedicated to this subject, Nathan takes us on a lush and holistic journey through experiences of every nature insightfully describing why each one is compelling. Large or small, digital, physical or natural, Nathan reminds us that experience is the personal connection with the moment and to realize that every aspect of living is an experience, whether we are the creators or simply chance participants. Terry Swack, Experience Design Strategist Once communication design encompassed form and content. And now communication occurs when form and content are engaged in a context that carries a message over time. What does this mean? Nathan Shedroff defines experience design with a keen observational sensitivity that reveals the nature...
Experience Design 1 Cards (writing, design, and production)

Experience Design 1 Cards (writing, design, and production)

Experience Design 1 Cards are a tool for designers to use during their brainstorming and idea generation. These cards correspond to the topics in Experience Design 1 and Experience Design 1.1 challenge designers and developers to think further and conceptualize around a broader experience. Each card contains several key questions to address during the design phase of a product, service, or event project and stimulates thinking around mre successful experiences. Explore the companion book, Experience Design 1.1, to the design cards, which discusses, in depth, the topics addressed. They are available for purchase as either a PDF or printed cards.      Topics: Experience Design Experiences Experience Taxonomy Product Taxonomy 100 Years Takeaways Information Design Data Information Knowledge Wisdom Cognitive Models Presentation Multiplicity Subjectivity Navigation Visualization Consistency Metaphors Interface Design Usability User Behavior Meaning Awareness Interaction Design Technology Interactivity Participants Feedback Control Creativity Productivity Communications Adaptivity Community Identity Participation Stroytelling Narrative Structure Non-linear Navigation Improvisation Point of View Narrative Extension The Senses Smell Taste Touch Sound Sight Sensorial Design Visual Design Immersion Time and Motion...

Catalog of Tomorrow chapters (writing)

The publishers of this Que book asked me to write two chapters about the future. I wrote one about Future Fashion and another about… oh I don’t remember. Anyone have a copy?...
Azure Wellness System (design, production, and strategy)

Azure Wellness System (design, production, and strategy)

I was the creative director for this nutriceutical company. I wasresponsible for all of the print materials (posters, catalogs, forms, etc.) as well as the packaging, identity, and all aspects except for the design of their website. 2000-2004 This nutritional supplement packaging was designed with the following goals: To make the packaging as inexpensive as possible since the user group is very price-conscious as most are on medical disability and have no regular income. Despite the low cost of the packaging, it needs to exhibit a validating sense of quality and potency. Our market research showed the concerns of our audience: Our customers didn’t want the impression that the packaging was elaborate or costly. They also didn’t respond well to packaging that seemed folksy, organic, or nature-oriented. Our customers were tired of their medicines and didn’t want their nutritional supplements to remind them of more medicine. Our solution included the following elements: Because the products are ordered online and over the phone and are never sold in a retail setting, we chose bags instead of boxes for the products with individual packs (to accommodate daily amounts with different pills). These bags were much less expensive and much less wasteful than traditional boxes as well as easier and faster to affix labels (directly printing labeling on the bags and bottles will be implemented when the company’s sales warrant the investment). Large, simple letters serve as identifying logos that distinguish each product in the system while forming a family of signifiers. These letters appear on all product literature as well as the side of the bags, allowing customers to identify different products from...