Kellogg’s Cereal Mixer

Kellogg’s Cereal Mixer

In 1998, working with some of the most fun professionals ever (especially Steve Gundrum and Davis Masten), vivid was hired by Mattson to work with Kellogg’s on an online customer cereal store. This system allowed anyone to create custom cereal using hundreds of ingredients with real time price and nutrition information. The solution was prototyped in a limited, closed-run, but Kellogg’s never let it loose in public. The code name for the project was “Jamaica” (for Ja-maka your own cereal). Sadly, I can’t find any of the screens from inside the customization and commerce engines. All I have are the following alternate homepages. From the first comps:   And the second round:    ...
Sustainable Mobile Phone Charrette

Sustainable Mobile Phone Charrette

In July of 2012, I and my colleague, Susan Worthman, led a group of experts from all over the mobile phone industry through a series of exercises, over two days to imagine how mobile phones could be more sustainable. Our frame for sustainability included not only materials and recycling but social and cultural issues as well as new business models. The charrette was hosted by the Lowell Center at the University of Massachusetts University of Massachusetts at the Santa Clara University campus. Participants were selected from a broad cross section of the cell phone industry, including manufacturers, service providers, and suppliers, along with representatives from NGOs, waste disposal industries, and other sustainable design experts. They collaboratively explored opportunities for increasing the sustainability of mobile phones, and the business and social ecosystems that surrounds their design, manufacture, use and disposal). The participants identified many challenges and potential solutions throughout the mobile phone life cycle and across a wide array of stakeholders. The synthesis of these observations were combined into three sets of concepts that might be achieved, grouped across three time periods: within 2-5 years, 5-10 years, and more than 10 years. Common themes that emerged include: the need for more explorations of this type and across the variety of domains touched here (and not merely the standard manufacturers and NGOs). user-configurable phones that allow customers to choose only the options and services they want and need (dubbed the “Lego phone” by the participants ) phones that are easier for customers to disassemble, replace parts, update, repair, and recycle. I think that many who attended were pretty skeptical, in the beginning, that there...
Herman Miller Assembly Instructions

Herman Miller Assembly Instructions

Believe it or not, this has been one of my more interesting projects with Herman Miller. The original instructions take over 12 pages of paper for all 4 products. They also weren’t the easiest to understand, either verablly or visually. 2001 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Creative Direction, Design, Production The new instructions use simple shading and consistent views to step people through the instructions in one sheet for each product (2 sides in the case of one product). The instructions include a lot of new information, such as assembly time and cleaning instructions. The new files are PDFs that are posted on the website as well as coming in the boxes with the furniture. The instructions before:   A PDF of the final...
Brand Futures Scenarios white paper (writing)

Brand Futures Scenarios white paper (writing)

I lead the initiative, with Davis Masten, within the AIGA Brand Design community to apply Scenario Planning techniques to the area of branding. In particular, we have published a Brand Futures White Paper (PDF) that summarizes our findings so far. This material is also being presented to both the IDSA (at their annual design conference in July 2002) as well as the AIGA Expeirence Design community (at their annual summit, also in July 2002). A proposal to make this materials into a visual and inspiring book ahs been completed and awaits a publisher’s interest. This material is an ongoing development process and the scenarios explored so far in these meetings (and described in the white paper ) include the following: Economic Nirvana In world economies, whether due to new priorities, technologies, understandings, or cooperation, the vast majority of people are now able to meet all subsistence needs (shelter, food, healthcare, work, education, etc.) and have, for the first time for many of them, something called leisure time and new opportunity to pursue other interests. How does this effect the development of global brands? Or, local ones? Do brands face more competition or less? Does everyone become more or less brand-conscious? Does increased prosperity increase the quantity of brands? What about the quality? Economic Peril The world economy suffers a tremendous collapse. Whether due to lack or resources (or accessibility), too much demand, insecure speculation, or political conflict that destroys the carefully balanced and orchestrated coordination of trade between countries, all monetary systems are severely devalued and a majority of people have problems meeting subsistence needs. Do people even worry about “brands”...
Azure Wellness System (design, production, and strategy)

Azure Wellness System (design, production, and strategy)

I was the creative director for this nutriceutical company. I wasresponsible for all of the print materials (posters, catalogs, forms, etc.) as well as the packaging, identity, and all aspects except for the design of their website. 2000-2004 This nutritional supplement packaging was designed with the following goals: To make the packaging as inexpensive as possible since the user group is very price-conscious as most are on medical disability and have no regular income. Despite the low cost of the packaging, it needs to exhibit a validating sense of quality and potency. Our market research showed the concerns of our audience: Our customers didn’t want the impression that the packaging was elaborate or costly. They also didn’t respond well to packaging that seemed folksy, organic, or nature-oriented. Our customers were tired of their medicines and didn’t want their nutritional supplements to remind them of more medicine. Our solution included the following elements: Because the products are ordered online and over the phone and are never sold in a retail setting, we chose bags instead of boxes for the products with individual packs (to accommodate daily amounts with different pills). These bags were much less expensive and much less wasteful than traditional boxes as well as easier and faster to affix labels (directly printing labeling on the bags and bottles will be implemented when the company’s sales warrant the investment). Large, simple letters serve as identifying logos that distinguish each product in the system while forming a family of signifiers. These letters appear on all product literature as well as the side of the bags, allowing customers to identify different products from...
Multimedia Demystified/Demystifying Multimedia (design, writing)

Multimedia Demystified/Demystifying Multimedia (design, writing)

ISBN: 0-679-75603-5 Demystifying Multimedia was commissioned by Apple Computer to become the source for information about the process of creating multimedia products. We concentrated on describing the process and roles involved with any interactive experience and left the descriptions of tools and commercial software to other books. This organization and selection of material has made it a timeless resource for helping readers find their way in a rapidly changing industry. This book was specifically designed to translate easily into color print and interactive CD-ROM editions. The book has been adopted as the industry standard for developers, producers, and readers who are interested in learning more about multimedia. It is also in the classrooms of multimedia courses at San Francisco State University, UCLA, University of Texas, University of Washington, University of Maine, and Helsinki’s University of Industrial Arts. Sadly, we had no control over the cover or the colorization of the book when it went to Random House. 1994 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Writing, Editing, Art Direction, Information and Visual Design, Illustration, Production Ken Fromm: Writing, Editing J. Sterling Hutto: Writing, Production, Project Management Henri Poole: Production, Content Expertise Mark Beaulieu: Writing, Research Chris Okon: Writing, Research James Cottle: Photography Kathleen Egge: Illustration, Production Randy Haykin: Client In brainstorming this book’s possible organization, we determined many valuable ways of arranging the content including, by process (the steps in creating a successful product), by role (the responsibilities and skills needed), and by project (the types of products that could be built). We settled on the idea of organizing the book by our development process but built indexes to the book from the point...