Demystifying Multimedia prototype ebook (design and production)

Demystifying Multimedia prototype ebook (design and production)

This project was a translation of the Demystifying Multimedia book into an electronic medium for giving presentations and speaking to audiences about the multimedia industry and process. It is meant to be an adjunct to a live presentation and not a self-contained product. However, the interface problems solved are directly translatable to a self-contained learning experience and reference product. 1994 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Interface and Visual Designs,...
The WEll Online Interface Prototype

The WEll Online Interface Prototype

The Whole Earth ‘Lectronic Link (WELL) is one of the oldest and tightly knit online communities, serving approximately 10,000 users worldwide since its inception in 1985. Services offered on the Sausalito, CA-based WELL include email and discussion groups on a wide variety of topics, all of which are currently accessible by a command-line interface. vivid designed a graphical user interface to enhance the quality of the WELL’s online experience and increase the WELL’s appeal to a larger audience. The diverse community of WELL users includes artists, educators, and business people, as well as those deeply entrenched in computer culture. vivid’s primary goal in this project was to maintain the unique feel of the community while broadening access to users who found the text-based interface difficult to use. vivid accomplished this by studying the behavior of users online and examining the information flow among those users. From this research, vivid was able to develop an intuitive graphical interface that will allow the WELL to expand its scope of services and manage increased traffic as the community grows larger. The WELL’s new interface was discontinued and to this day is still text-based. 1994 Participants: Henri Poole: Producer Nathan Shedroff: Interaction, Information, and Visual Design, Production Jeff Wishnie: Interaction and Information Design, Production, Technical Development Eric Gould: Interaction Design Corrine Okoda: Illustration and Visual...
Delphi Online Interface Prototype (design)

Delphi Online Interface Prototype (design)

When News Corp. bought Delphi Internet Services, they asked us to build a prototype of what the service might look like. This was long before the Web and the state of the art was 1200 bps downloads over phone lines. The interface was built to organize the wealth of what would be on the service while performing as fast as possible. It looks hopelessly simple by today’s standards but it was the state of the art at the time.   1994 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Interaction, Information, and Visual Design,...
ETAK/SONY Navigator (design)

ETAK/SONY Navigator (design)

vivid developed the system interface for this in-car CD-ROM-based navigation product. ETAK contracted vivid to design and document the interface standards to SONY’s latest after-market navigator with Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) sensor and color active-matrix screen. The device is installed in the dashboard near the driver and allows both drivers and passengers to view maps and related travel information from regional CD-ROMs. The interface encompasses color photographs and information on sights, restaurants, hotels, and historical information from Fodor’s travel guides and Trailer Life RV Guides. The system allows users to filter the information and see related photos. Map portions of the system constantly track the driver’s car with relation to internal map databases and GPS. Currently, CD-ROMs are shipping for California and Florida with many more in the series in production. The system is sold in the United States by SONY of America, Inc. and the production of the CD-ROMs takes place at ETAK. You can find information about the products on the ETAK site here. 1993 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Information and Visual...
Finding Your Voice CD-ROM Prototype (design)

Finding Your Voice CD-ROM Prototype (design)

Finding Your Voice is a prototype for a product designed to help junior high school students learn to tell stories. In particular, it was designed to help them develop better ways of expressing themselves and telling their personal stories. Although it was not designed as an anti-text product, it was specifically developed with little focus on text and concentrated on verbal and visual storytelling to help pull in those students who traditionally drop out or turn off because they lack well-developed reading and writing skills. 1993 Participants: Brenda Laurel: Content Expertise, Producer Abbe Don: Project Management, Interaction Design, Programming Nathan Shedroff: Information Design, Visual Design, Production Lucinda deLorimier: Story Development. Content Expertise Rachel Strickland: Videography James Cottle: Photography, Production Amy Jo Bilsen: Animation This project was organized into nine sections with each representing one step in the process of telling a story or giving a presentation. In each section, one of three guides will share thoughts and experiences about the topic in their own lives and work. In this way, the information is delivered with a maximum of experiential media and a minimum of text. While this product isn’t overtly anti-text, it is consciously trying to communicate in non-textual ways to specifically appeal to the many students who do not feel comfortable with their reading and writing skills and, therefore, do not participate in creative classroom activities as much as others. The program is structured to be explor-atory and satisfy curiosity while still being clear in its structure and navigation. The links between related materials are not present in this version of the prototype. In the design of this product’s interface,...