Herman Miller Red Website (strategy)

Herman Miller Red Website (strategy)

  In 2000, I consulted to this new division of Herman Miller, a well-established furniture company known for placing a high value on original design. I worked on the information and interaction design of the website and the overall customer experience online and offline, such as the assembly instructions. The visual design and engineering was handled by Xceed in Dallas. I was brought-in to be a sounding board and a voice in the company’s ear in their dealings with their developer as well as an expert in usability, information and interaction design, and someone to keep his eyes on the overall experience across media. The important features of this website were to make the process of selecting and buying furniture easy and interesting. There are several ways of viewing the furniture, including a matrix page that shows all of the products organized by line and category and, roughly, by price. By seeing all of the offerings at once, customers quickly became acquainted with the breadth of the company’s products as well as which ones (and how many) might appeal to them. There were categorical views as well as collections by product line family. I developed a Needs-based furniture selector (shown below in annotated prototype form) so that people would have the ability to find furniture by their needs instead of having to research each product line and piece individually. This allowed them to more quickly determine which products can solve their problems. I worked with a new division of Herman Miller, called RED, to design a commerce system online for their products. I worked mostly on strategy and information design as...
IADAS Website (strategy)

IADAS Website (strategy)

In 1999, Tiffany Shlain, who originated the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, asked me to prepare an online strategy for them.
COSM Interface (design)

COSM Interface (design)

This protoype screen was for a facility and organizational tool for large companies. It was based on a technology built by the Xerox spin-off, Inxight. The product implemented a complex but effective set of process tools called MasterPlan. 1998