Danny Goodman’s Macintosh Handbook book (design, production, and project management)

Danny Goodman’s Macintosh Handbook book (design, production, and project management)

ISBN: 0-553-35485-X (Macintosh) ISBN: 0-679-75586-1 (Windows) Danny Goodman’s Macintosh Handbook was designed to set a new standard for “how-to” computer reference books. It was designed not only to take advantage of a 4-color presentation and to introduce and support the Macintosh interface in its own design, but to make it easy for different kinds of readers with different experience levels find answers quickly and understand key relationships. It makes extensive use of tools that can help print books perform a bit as electronic products do and bridges the gap between these two media. 1993 Participants: Danny Goodman: Writing Richard Saul Wurman: Information and Visual Design Nathan Shedroff: Information and Visual Design, Illustration, Production, Project Management J. Sterling Hutto: Production Scott Summers: Illustration Kitti Homme: Production Tom Beatty: Production Michael Everitt: Production Jane Rosch: Client Contact The interaction design for this project was kept simple and relevant to giving presentations on the material. There is a navigation palette for quickly moving between topics and content. The icons at the top of the screen indicate the roles involved with the topic on the screen and jump to a description of the responsibilities for each role. All of the text in this book is written to make sense as short paragraphs that explain procedures concisely and clearly. Readers can quickly get the answers they need without reading through paragraphs of unnecessary information. Also, there was a conscious decision to make sure that all topics fit on one page or one spread. This means that when a reader finds the right topic, the answer is in front of him or her somewhere and not pages away. There...
ETAK/SONY Navigator (design)

ETAK/SONY Navigator (design)

vivid developed the system interface for this in-car CD-ROM-based navigation product. ETAK contracted vivid to design and document the interface standards to SONY’s latest after-market navigator with Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) sensor and color active-matrix screen. The device is installed in the dashboard near the driver and allows both drivers and passengers to view maps and related travel information from regional CD-ROMs. The interface encompasses color photographs and information on sights, restaurants, hotels, and historical information from Fodor’s travel guides and Trailer Life RV Guides. The system allows users to filter the information and see related photos. Map portions of the system constantly track the driver’s car with relation to internal map databases and GPS. Currently, CD-ROMs are shipping for California and Florida with many more in the series in production. The system is sold in the United States by SONY of America, Inc. and the production of the CD-ROMs takes place at ETAK. You can find information about the products on the ETAK site here. 1993 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Information and Visual...
Finding Your Voice CD-ROM Prototype (design)

Finding Your Voice CD-ROM Prototype (design)

Finding Your Voice is a prototype for a product designed to help junior high school students learn to tell stories. In particular, it was designed to help them develop better ways of expressing themselves and telling their personal stories. Although it was not designed as an anti-text product, it was specifically developed with little focus on text and concentrated on verbal and visual storytelling to help pull in those students who traditionally drop out or turn off because they lack well-developed reading and writing skills. 1993 Participants: Brenda Laurel: Content Expertise, Producer Abbe Don: Project Management, Interaction Design, Programming Nathan Shedroff: Information Design, Visual Design, Production Lucinda deLorimier: Story Development. Content Expertise Rachel Strickland: Videography James Cottle: Photography, Production Amy Jo Bilsen: Animation This project was organized into nine sections with each representing one step in the process of telling a story or giving a presentation. In each section, one of three guides will share thoughts and experiences about the topic in their own lives and work. In this way, the information is delivered with a maximum of experiential media and a minimum of text. While this product isn’t overtly anti-text, it is consciously trying to communicate in non-textual ways to specifically appeal to the many students who do not feel comfortable with their reading and writing skills and, therefore, do not participate in creative classroom activities as much as others. The program is structured to be explor-atory and satisfy curiosity while still being clear in its structure and navigation. The links between related materials are not present in this version of the prototype. In the design of this product’s interface,...
Understanding Computers CD-ROM (design and production)

Understanding Computers CD-ROM (design and production)

The Understanding Computers CD-ROM is an electronic book designed to convey the same messages and content that the print version does, but with the added dimensions provided by of electronic and interactive media. While it remains “bookish,” it uses interactive tools to create an experience where users can browse at their own pace, search for specific information, and interact with some key technologies and concepts. It has yet to be produced. This is merely a well-built prototype used for testing these solutions with the audience for which it was designed. 1992 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Writing, Design, Illustration, Programming, Production J. Sterling Hutto: Project Management Henri Poole: Programming, Project Management Kathleen Egge: Illustration Brooks Cole: Animations Sheryl Hampton: Video Production All of the content from the printed book is included here, but new content has been added to respond to the available sound and visual media, as well as the capabilities of interactive technologies and the greater capacity of data storage. The bookmap displays an overview of the product’s contents with chapter sizes that correspond to the amount of information and number of screens within each chapter. Readers can navigate from this palette by clicking on a chapter or dragging the pointer to any point in the bookmap (similar to opening up a printed book anywhere). The design uses the same color-coding as in the printed book. The colors in the background and screen elements help reinforce the chapter distinctions. The video used in this product is masked to appear as a moving illustration instead of a rectilinear window. This technique allows the video to be integrated into the layout with the...
Digital Restaurant Guide application (design)

Digital Restaurant Guide application (design)

This guide to over 2000 restaurants in San Francisco and surroundings was developed especially for PowerBooks. Each restaurant is located by its geographic coordinates on the many maps. The product allows users to search for restaurants in a variety of different ways, including geographically, alphabetically, by food type, by rating, and from a list of “Bests.” Users are able to start and edit their own “Bests” lists and make changes to the data for their personal uses. The information includes ratings for overall performance, coffee quality, wine list, ambience, and service. Many menus are included, as well as prices, descriptions, hours, and parking information. The Digital Restaurant Guide was designed for legibility on monochrome screens and is currently available through Digital Lantern and the Apple Company Store. It is updated quarterly. It was also available as a website at one time but, as you can see, the monodhrome display isn’t what it could be in the medium of the Web. 1992 Participants: Mark Beaulieu: Producer, Writer, Content Aquisition Henri Poole: Programmer Nathan Shedroff: Information, Interaction, and Visual...