Experience Design 1 Book (writing, design, and production)

Experience Design 1 Book (writing, design, and production)

Peachpit/New Riders gave me an awesome opportunity in 2000 to write and design the first book to discuss experience design. In became a manifesto of sorts… Experience Design (2001) By Nathan Shedroff (writing, design, and production) ISBN: 9780735710788 10″x8″ 308 pages, 4-color Experience Design 1 is a book about today’s intersection of disciplines, such as: interaction design, information design, visual design, and more related methodologies are just parts of the whole. Practiced by many people around the world, experience design is as much an approach and ethic, as it is a field of work. Experience Design is not only a way of designing online experience (such as websites), as but more importantly, it is a way of approaching all design, including products, services, environments, and events. Read cover to cover, Experience Design 1 is a kind of text book containing theory as well as examples. Opened to a page at random, it’s a source of inspiration that can be used to challenge your thinking when working on a creative project. The latest version of this book is Experience Design 1.1 and is now in print, available for purchase as either a PDF or printed book. Sample Spreads…          Praise for the book: An insightful road guide to the “Experience Economy.” Nathan connects the dots and helps us understand the importance of “experience design”. An invaluable resource and a must to experience. Clement Mok, Chief Creative Officer, Sapient. Only in recent years has ‘experience design’ emerged as a community of practice driven by digital and related design professionals who believe that deeply understanding people is the key to great design in any medium. Appropriately, as...
Mutant Food book chapter (writing)

Mutant Food book chapter (writing)

I was asked to write a chapter for this fun book. 1995 From the book, The Happy Mutant Handbook Food serves many purposes, but to mutants there is only one that is most important. While all foods should be tasty and nutritious, mutant food is primarily conceptual. Mutants play not only with their food, but with the entire concept of food, and which foods are appropriate for which occasions. We have outlined several categories below to help spark your creativity in planning, preparing, and eating like a true mutant. The Conceptual Think of food as a source of learning–not just one of nourishment. Buy gummy ABCs and Alphabits cereal and use to play Scrabble, Hangman, or Wheel of Fortune. Gummy ABCs are especially useful since they will stick to most surfaces if you lick their backs a little. Keep plenty around the kitchen in case you need to leave a quick note for someone on the fridge. Just about any food can be disguised as something else. Meat and vegetable patés (purée and mix with cream cheese) can be molded into any shape. Cover with frosting for a surprising Birthday Cake. Fruit peels can be arranged into flowers. The Exotic Besides Jell-O, few things are still exotic in our culture. Red Bell Peppers and Cilantro are passé now that every Safeway on earth carries them. However, fear not. You can still find ways to amaze your friends. Look to other cultures for hints. Ants and other insects are not only nutritious and crunchy (especially baked), but you can’t even order them at the most chic restaurants (not yet, anyway). Ants, crickets,...
Careers in Multimedia book (creative direction)

Careers in Multimedia book (creative direction)

ISBN 1-56276-311-3 vivid wrote, designed, and produced this book for ZD Press. It is the result of many years of our experience in the multimedia industries. This book covered everything readers need to know in order to find work (or find employees). It discusses the various roles involved with multimedia projects (and there are a lot of them), describing each in details such as: experience needed, how to find work, how to find people to do the work, where to network, what resources to use, how to interview, and what skills are involved in each one. In other sections, the book describes the various platforms and prototypical projects, the infrastructures that support these industries (and how these relate to work), and the various hotspots of activity around the world (yes, that means international information). Typical compensation figures are included for the various roles as well. 1995 Participants: Ken Fromm: Editor Nathan Shedroff: Information Design and Creative Direction Drue Miller: Information Design, Visual Design, and Editing Candice Kollar: Production Nigel French: Production Steve de Brun: Production Kathleen Egge: Production Maurice Tani: Production Bondy Bondurant: Proofing David Wasserman: Photography Misty West:...
Multimedia Demystified/Demystifying Multimedia (design, writing)

Multimedia Demystified/Demystifying Multimedia (design, writing)

ISBN: 0-679-75603-5 Demystifying Multimedia was commissioned by Apple Computer to become the source for information about the process of creating multimedia products. We concentrated on describing the process and roles involved with any interactive experience and left the descriptions of tools and commercial software to other books. This organization and selection of material has made it a timeless resource for helping readers find their way in a rapidly changing industry. This book was specifically designed to translate easily into color print and interactive CD-ROM editions. The book has been adopted as the industry standard for developers, producers, and readers who are interested in learning more about multimedia. It is also in the classrooms of multimedia courses at San Francisco State University, UCLA, University of Texas, University of Washington, University of Maine, and Helsinki’s University of Industrial Arts. Sadly, we had no control over the cover or the colorization of the book when it went to Random House. 1994 Participants: Nathan Shedroff: Writing, Editing, Art Direction, Information and Visual Design, Illustration, Production Ken Fromm: Writing, Editing J. Sterling Hutto: Writing, Production, Project Management Henri Poole: Production, Content Expertise Mark Beaulieu: Writing, Research Chris Okon: Writing, Research James Cottle: Photography Kathleen Egge: Illustration, Production Randy Haykin: Client In brainstorming this book’s possible organization, we determined many valuable ways of arranging the content including, by process (the steps in creating a successful product), by role (the responsibilities and skills needed), and by project (the types of products that could be built). We settled on the idea of organizing the book by our development process but built indexes to the book from the point...